Waverley - Walter Scott

Waverley

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This historical novel tells of a romantic young English captain in Scotland who strives for love, harmony and peace during the Jacobite rebellion in 1745. He becomes one of the leaders of the insurrection directed against the English. There is romance and adventure in this tale as our young hero is forced to test his loyalties to his country and the love of his life. Its unprecedented success prompted Scott to write more than two dozen novels in a similar vein–commonly designated the Waverley Novels–which describe the lives of ordinary individuals who become involved in great historical events and present in lavish detail the speech, manners, and customs of past ages. In Waverley, this past record focuses on the declining feudal culture of the Scottish Highlands prior to Scotland’s absorption into Great Britain.

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WALTER SCOTT

WAVERLEY

OR ‘TIS SIXTY YEARS SINCE

Warsaw 2017

 

Contents

THE AUTHOR’S ADDRESS TO ALL IN GENERAL

VOLUME I

I. INTRODUCTORY

II. WAVERLEY HONOUR—A RETROSPECT

III. EDUCATION

IV. CASTLE-BUILDING

V. CHOICE OF A PROFESSION

VI. THE ADIEUS OF WAVERLEY

VII. A HORSE-QUARTER IN SCOTLAND

VIII. A SCOTTISH MANOR-HOUSE SIXTY YEARS SINCE

IX. MORE OF THE MANOR-HOUSE AND ITS ENVIRONS

X. ROSE BRADWARDINE AND HER FATHER

XI. THE BANQUET

XII. REPENTANCE AND A RECONCILIATION

XIII. A MORE RATIONAL DAY THAN THE LAST

XIV. WAVERLEY BECOMES DOMESTICATED AT TULLY-VEOLAN

XV. A CREAGH, AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

XVI. AN UNEXPECTED ALLY APPEARS

XVII. THE HOLD OF A HIGHLAND ROBBER

XVIII. WAVERLEY PROCEEDS ON HIS JOURNEY

XIX. THE CHIEF AND HIS MANSION

XX. A HIGHLAND FEAST

XXI. THE CHIEFTAIN’S SISTER

XXII. HIGHLAND MINSTRELSY

XXIII. WAVERLEY CONTINUES AT GLENNAQUOICH

XXIV. STAG-HUNT AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

XXV. NEWS FROM ENGLAND

XXVI. AN ECLAIRCISSEMENT

XXVII. UPON THE SAME SUBJECT

XXVIII. A LETTER FROM TULLY-VEOLAN

XXIX. WAVERLEY’S RECEPTION IN THE LOWLANDS

VOLUME II

I. LOSS OF A HORSE’S SHOE MAY BE A SERIOUS INCONVENIENCE

II. AN EXAMINATION

III. A CONFERENCE, AND THE CONSEQUENCE

IV. A CONFIDANT

V. THINGS MEND A LITTLE

VI. A VOLUNTEER SIXTY YEARS SINCE

VII. AN INCIDENT

VIII. WAVERLEY IS STILL IN DISTRESS

IX. A NOCTURNAL ADVENTURE

X. THE JOURNEY IS CONTINUED

XI. AN OLD AND A NEW ACQUAINTANCE

XII. THE MYSTERY BEGINS TO BE CLEARED

XIII. A SOLDIER’S DINNER

XIV. THE BALL

XV. THE MARCH

XVI. AN INCIDENT GIVES RISE TO UNAVAILING REFLECTIONS

XVII. THE EVE OF BATTLE

XVIII. THE CONFLICT

XIX. AN UNEXPECTED EMBARRASSMENT

XX. THE ENGLISH PRISONER

XXI. RATHER UNIMPORTANT

XXII. INTRIGUES OF LOVE AND POLITICS

XXIII. INTRIGUES OF SOCIETY AND LOVE

XXIV. FERGUS A SUITOR

XXV. "TO ONE THING CONSTANT NEVER"

XXVI. A BRAVE MAN IN SORROW

XXVII. EXERTION

XXVIII. THE MARCH

XXIX. THE CONFUSION OF KING AGRAMANT’S CAMP

XXX. A SKIRMISH

XXXI. CHAPTER OF ACCIDENTS

XXXII. A JOURNEY TO LONDON

XXXIII. WHAT’S TO BE DONE NEXT?

XXXIV. DESOLATION

XXXV. COMPARING OF NOTES

XXXVI. MORE EXPLANATION

XXXVII

XXXVIII

XXXIX

XL

XLI. DULCE DOMUM

XLII

XLIII. A POSTSCRIPT WHICH SHOULD HAVE BEEN A PREFACE

 

THE AUTHOR’S ADDRESS TO ALL IN GENERAL


Now, gentle readers, I have let you ken
My very thoughts, from heart and pen,
‘Tis needless for to conten’
Or yet controule,
For there’s not a word o’t I can men’;
So ye must thole.

For on both sides some were not good;
I saw them murd’ring in cold blood,
Not the gentlemen, but wild and rude,
The baser sort,
Who to the wounded had no mood
But murd’ring sport!

Ev’n both at Preston and Falkirk,
That fatal night ere it grew mirk,
Piercing the wounded with their durk,
Caused many cry!
Such pity’s shown from Savage and Turk
As peace to die.

A woe be to such hot zeal,
To smite the wounded on the fiell!
It’s just they got such groats in kail,
Who do the same.
It only teaches crueltys real
To them again.

I’ve seen the men call’d Highland rogues,
With Lowland men make shangs a brogs,
Sup kail and brose, and fling the cogs
Out at the door,
Take cocks, hens, sheep, and hogs,
And pay nought for.

I saw a Highlander, ‘t was right drole,
With a string of puddings hung on a pole,
Whip’d o’er his shoulder, skipped like a fole,
Caus’d Maggy bann,
Lap o’er the midden and midden-hole,
And aff he ran.

When check’d for this, they’d often tell ye,
‘Indeed her nainsell’s a tume belly;
You’ll no gie’t wanting bought, nor sell me;
Hersell will hae’t;
Go tell King Shorge, and Shordy’s Willie,
I’ll hae a meat.’

I saw the soldiers at Linton-brig,
Because the man was not a Whig,
Of meat and drink leave not a skig,
Within his door;
They burnt his very hat and wig,
And thump’d him sore.

And through the Highlands they were so rude,
As leave them neither clothes nor food,
Then burnt their houses to conclude;
‘T was tit for tat.
How can her nainsell e’er be good,
To think on that?

And after all, O, shame and grief!
To use some worse than murd’ring thief,
Their very gentleman and chief,
Unhumanly!
Like Popish tortures, I believe,
Such cruelty.

Ev’n what was act on open stage
At Carlisle, in the hottest rage,
When mercy was clapt in a cage,
And pity dead,
Such cruelty approv’d by every age,
I shook my head.

So many to curse, so few to pray,
And some aloud huzza did cry;
They cursed the rebel Scots that day,
As they’d been nowt
Brought up for slaughter, as that way
Too many rowt.

Therefore, alas! dear countrymen,
O never do the like again,
To thirst for vengeance, never ben’
Your gun nor pa’,
But with the English e’en borrow and len’,
Let anger fa’.

Their boasts and bullying, not worth a louse,
As our King’s the best about the house.
‘T is ay good to be sober and douce,
To live in peace;
For many, I see, for being o’er crouse,
Gets broken face.

VOLUME I

 

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTORY

The title of this work has not been chosen without the grave and solid deliberation which matters of importance demand from the prudent. Even its first, or general denomination, was the result of no common research or selection, although, according to the example of my predecessors, I had only to seize upon the most sounding and euphonic surname that English history or topography affords, and elect it at once as the title of my work and the name of my hero. But, alas! what could my readers have expected from the chivalrous epithets of Howard, Mordaunt, Mortimer, or Stanley, or from the softer and more sentimental sounds of Belmour, Belville, Belfield, and Belgrave, but pages of inanity, similar to those which have been so christened for half a century past? I must modestly admit I am too diffident of my own merit to place it in unnecessary opposition to preconceived associations; I have, therefore, like a maiden knight with his white shield, assumed for my hero, WAVERLEY, an uncontaminated name, bearing with its sound little of good or evil, excepting what the reader shall hereafter be pleased to affix to it. But my second or supplemental title was a matter of much more difficult election, since that, short as it is, may be held as pledging the author to some special mode of laying his scene, drawing his characters, and managing his adventures. Had I, for example, announced in my frontispiece, ‘Waverley, a Tale of other Days,’ must not every novel-reader have anticipated a castle scarce less than that of Udolpho, of which the eastern wing had long been uninhabited, and the keys either lost, or consigned to the care of some aged butler or housekeeper, whose trembling steps, about the middle of the second volume, were doomed to guide the hero, or heroine, to the ruinous precincts? Would not the owl have shrieked and the cricket cried in my very title-page? and could it have been possible for me, with a moderate attention to decorum, to introduce any scene more lively than might be produced by the jocularity of a clownish but faithful valet, or the garrulous narrative of the heroine’s fille-de-chambre, when rehearsing the stories of blood and horror which she had heard in the servants’ hall? Again, had my title borne, ‘Waverley, a Romance from the German,’ what head so obtuse as not to image forth a profligate abbot, an oppressive duke, a secret and mysterious association of Rosycrucians and Illuminati, with all their properties of black cowls, caverns, daggers, electrical machines, trap-doors, and dark-lanterns? Or if I had rather chosen to call my work a ‘Sentimental Tale,’ would it not have been a sufficient presage of a heroine with a profusion of auburn hair, and a harp, the soft solace of her solitary hours, which she fortunately finds always the means of transporting from castle to cottage, although she herself be sometimes obliged to jump out of a two-pair-of-stairs window, and is more than once bewildered on her journey, alone and on foot, without any guide but a blowzy peasant girl, whose jargon she hardly can understand? Or, again, if my Waverley had been entitled ‘A Tale of the Times,’ wouldst thou not, gentle reader, have demanded from me a dashing sketch of the fashionable world, a few anecdotes of private scandal thinly veiled, and if lusciously painted, so much the better? a heroine from Grosvenor Square, and a hero from the Barouche Club or the Four-in-Hand, with a set of subordinate characters from the elegantes of Queen Anne Street East, or the dashing heroes of the Bow-Street Office? I could proceed in proving the importance of a title-page, and displaying at the same time my own intimate knowledge of the particular ingredients necessary to the composition of romances and novels of various descriptions;–but it is enough, and I scorn to tyrannise longer over the impatience of my reader, who is doubtless already anxious to know the choice made by an author so profoundly versed in the different branches of his art.

By fixing, then, the date of my story Sixty Years before this present 1st November, 1805, I would have my readers understand, that they will meet in the following pages neither a romance of chivalry nor a tale of modern manners; that my hero will neither have iron on his shoulders, as of yore, nor on the heels of his boots, as is the present fashion of Bond Street; and that my damsels will neither be clothed ‘in purple and in pall,’ like the Lady Alice of an old ballad, nor reduced to the primitive nakedness of a modern fashionable at a rout. From this my choice of an era the understanding critic may farther presage that the object of my tale is more a description of men than manners. A tale of manners, to be interesting, must either refer to antiquity so great as to have become venerable, or it must bear a vivid reflection of those scenes which are passing daily before our eyes, and are interesting from their novelty. Thus the coat-of-mail of our ancestors, and the triple-furred pelisse of our modern beaux, may, though for very different reasons, be equally fit for the array of a fictitious character; but who, meaning the costume of his hero to be impressive, would willingly attire him in the court dress of George the Second’s reign, with its no collar, large sleeves, and low pocket-holes? The same may be urged, with equal truth, of the Gothic hall, which, with its darkened and tinted windows, its elevated and gloomy roof, and massive oaken table garnished with boar’s-head and rosemary, pheasants and peacocks, cranes and cygnets, has an excellent effect in fictitious description. Much may also be gained by a lively display of a modern fete, such as we have daily recorded in that part of a newspaper entitled the Mirror of Fashion, if we contrast these, or either of them, with the splendid formality of an entertainment given Sixty Years Since; and thus it will be readily seen how much the painter of antique or of fashionable manners gains over him who delineates those of the last generation.

Considering the disadvantages inseparable from this part of my subject, I must be understood to have resolved to avoid them as much as possible, by throwing the force of my narrative upon the characters and passions of the actors;–those passions common to men in all stages of society, and which have alike agitated the human heart, whether it throbbed under the steel corslet of the fifteenth century, the brocaded coat of the eighteenth, or the blue frock and white dimity waistcoat of the present day. [Footnote: Alas! that attire, respectable and gentlemanlike in 1805, or thereabouts, is now as antiquated as the Author of Waverley has himself become since that period! The reader of fashion will please to fill up the costume with an embroidered waistcoat of purple velvet or silk, and a coat of whatever colour he pleases.] Upon these passions it is no doubt true that the state of manners and laws casts a necessary colouring; but the bearings, to use the language of heraldry, remain the same, though the tincture may be not only different, but opposed in strong contradistinction. The wrath of our ancestors, for example, was coloured gules; it broke forth in acts of open and sanguinary violence against the objects of its fury. Our malignant feelings, which must seek gratification through more indirect channels, and undermine the obstacles which they cannot openly bear down, may be rather said to be tinctured sable. But the deep-ruling impulse is the same in both cases; and the proud peer, who can now only ruin his neighbour according to law, by protracted suits, is the genuine descendant of the baron who wrapped the castle of his competitor in flames, and knocked him on the head as he endeavoured to escape from the conflagration. It is from the great book of Nature, the same through a thousand editions, whether of black-letter, or wire-wove and hot-pressed, that I have venturously essayed to read a chapter to the public. Some favourable opportunities of contrast have been afforded me by the state of society in the northern part of the island at the period of my history, and may serve at once to vary and to illustrate the moral lessons, which I would willingly consider as the most important part of my plan; although I am sensible how short these will fall of their aim if I shall be found unable to mix them with amusement–a task not quite so easy in this critical generation as it was ‘Sixty Years Since.’

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